FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
8:16 a.m. ET

President Trump was up and tweeting early Saturday, offering his thoughts on a range of topics centrally including his desire to see Hillary Clinton under federal investigation instead of his own team.

Trump began by objecting to The Washington Post's Friday night report that Attorney General Jeff Sessions did discuss campaign matters with the Russian ambassador last year, contrary to Sessions' account. After a detour to discuss his plans for the day and blame The New York Times for Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi still being alive, the president got back to the subject of investigations:

Special Counsel Robert Mueller is investigating alleged Trump campaign involvement in Russian election meddling, and Sessions has recused himself from that probe. Bonnie Kristian

7:59 a.m. ET
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak told Moscow he discussed campaign matters on two occasions with Attorney General Jeff Sessions, then a senator and Trump campaign surrogate, during the 2016 election, The Washington Post reported Friday night, citing U.S. intelligence intercepts of Kislyak's communications.

Sessions initially said he "did not have communications with the Russians," claiming he did not remember any such meetings, and then later said the talks were not about campaign matters. The first meeting happened during the Republican National Convention last summer, and the second happened in September.

President Trump expressed regret ever his appointment of Sessions in an interview Wednesday, before the Post report. "A new INTELLIGENCE LEAK from the Amazon Washington Post,this time against A.G. Jeff Sessions.These illegal leaks, like Comey's, must stop!" Trump tweeted Saturday morning, again suggesting his 2016 rival, Hillary Clinton, should be subject to investigation instead of his team. Bonnie Kristian

July 21, 2017
Alex Wong/Getty Images

White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer already has a name in mind for the chapter of his life that he spent serving under President Trump. In an interview with The Washington Post on Friday, the day he submitted his resignation, Spicer suggested he'd call this particular chapter that's coming to a close "Exciting Times." "Hopefully we're midway through the book of my life," Spicer said, when asked what he'll do once he leaves in August.

Though Spicer may have made some ill-advised comparisons to Adolf Hitler and hid in the bushes during his 182-day-long tenure, he insisted Friday that he has no regrets. He claimed he's stepping aside because the president "wanted to bring on some folks"; The New York Times reported Spicer stepped down because he "vehemently disagreed with the appointment" of Anthony Scaramucci as communications director. "[It was] better to give them an opportunity to have a clean slate and evaluate what we've done. To figure out what's working and what needs to be improved upon," Spicer said.

Spicer didn't offer any specifics on what he'll do next, though he said he's "sure there will be plenty of opportunities." Becca Stanek

July 21, 2017
Andrew Harrer-Pool/Getty Images

Ousted National Security Adviser Michael Flynn has a new consulting firm: Resilient Patriot, LLC. In his post-Trump administration venture, Flynn will advise private equity firms on potential deals. Though Resilient Patriot is the name Flynn's son — who posted about the Pizzagate conspiracy theory — used on Twitter, Flynn's son will not be involved.

Flynn's brother told The Associated Press that while there's still a "cloud over" his brother, he is "moving on with his life" since he resigned in February after misleading Vice President Mike Pence about his conversations with Russian Ambassador Sergey Kislyak. "I think he's not worried about going to jail or anything like that," Flynn's brother said.

Flynn is being looked at as part of the ongoing investigation into whether there was any collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 presidential election. Flynn, who didn't register as a foreign agent until after he resigned, also failed to disclose income from three Russia-linked firms. Becca Stanek

July 21, 2017
iStock

Accused al Qaeda recruiter Ali Charaf Damache is scheduled to face a civilian trial Friday in Philadelphia, breaking with President Trump's campaign promise to fill Guantánamo Bay with "bad dudes." Hardliners, including Attorney General Jeff Sessions, have traditionally criticized the prosecution of suspected terrorists on American soil, with Sessions in particular claiming such suspects "do not deserve the same legal rights as common criminals and that such trials were too dangerous to hold on American soil," The New York Times writes. "With Mr. Damache's transfer, Mr. Sessions has adopted a strategy that he vehemently opposed when it was carried out under President Barack Obama."

An Algerian and Irish citizen, Damache was transferred to the U.S. from Spain and is suspected of plotting a failed attempt to kill a Swedish cartoonist who drew the Prophet Muhammad with a dog's body. Damache is also believed to have worked as a recruiter for al Qaeda.

"For years, Republicans portrayed civilian trials as a weakness in Mr. Obama's national security policy," the Times writes, adding: "Mr. Damache's transfer represents a collision of the Trump administration's tough rhetoric and the reality of fighting terrorism in 2017." Read more at The New York Times. Jeva Lange

July 21, 2017
Courtesy image

Rompers for men are "nowhere near new," but they may never have a moment like they did earlier this year. Decades after James Bond rocked a similar one-piece on screen, a garment called the RompHim divided the nation when it made its first social-media appearance in May, and by the time its creators started shipping to customers, "a slew" of knockoffs were trawling for startup funding on Kickstarter, most of them failing to repeat the RompHim's success. But one company, Getonfleek, went wild with the concept, churning out scores of outré variations. The top seller? This tribute to Kim Jong Un ($100). The Week Staff

July 21, 2017

Hours after he issued his resignation Friday, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer tweeted that it's "been an honor and a privilege to serve" under President Trump. Spicer said that he will step down from his role in August:

Spicer's resignation was announced shortly after it was confirmed that Trump had offered Anthony Scaramucci the role of communications director. The New York Times reported that Spicer "vehemently disagreed" with the appointment of the Wall Street financier. Trump reportedly asked Spicer to stay on, but Spicer declined.

The Associated Press reported that Spicer said after his resignation that he thinks the White House "could benefit from a clean slate." Becca Stanek

July 21, 2017
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

Anthony Scaramucci, President Trump's newly hired communications director, is on the books as having donated a nice chunk of change to former President Barack Obama and former Vice President Joe Biden in 2008. FEC donor records indicate the Wall Street financier gave $2,300 to Obama for America on May 31, 2008, the Chicago Sun-Times' Washington Bureau Chief Lynn Sweet reported.

Now, Trump himself has also donated to Democrats, including to Hillary Clinton and the Clinton Foundation, as well as the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee and the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

But on top of Scaramucci's donation, the new communications director has also made some less-than-complimentary comments about his new boss. In an August 2015 appearance on Fox Business, Scaramucci called Trump a "hack politician" and "an inherited money dude from Queens County."

The president's staff wasn't exactly on board with his decision to hire Scaramucci either: Scaramucci's hiring was apparently the impetus for White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer's resignation Friday. White House Chief of Staff Reince Priebus and Trump's chief strategist Stephen Bannon also reportedly weren't thrilled. Becca Stanek

See More Speed Reads