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April 21, 2017

Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) took to Twitter Thursday evening to communicate directly with the proletariat about the endless extravagance of those gaudy rich:

It was a message with just one problem:

The senator from Vermont is indeed the owner of three homes, the most recent of which is a $575,000 lakefront vacation house he bought in August. As Ed Morrissey notes at Hot Air, Twitter might find it easier not to begrudge Sanders his choices were he not actively "selling grudges as part of his professional life." Bonnie Kristian

5:53 a.m. ET

On Tuesday, lucky Brooklynites got to witness the rare spectacle of a rogue cow running around the Prospect Park area. On Tuesday's Jimmy Kimmel Live, Kimmel had an update on the situation, and it is happier than you might think, given the animal's provenance. "So this cow — which is not actually a cow, it was a baby bull — escaped from a slaughterhouse, the only slaughterhouse in Brooklyn that hasn't been converted into an art gallery/event space yet," he explained.

The NYPD finally wrangled the bull after two hours marauding around Brooklyn — something New York's finest have a surprising amount of experience with, Kimmel noted. "This is the third cow chase in New York in two years — I think you guys might be going a little overboard with the farm-to-table thing." But the bull isn't going back to the slaughterhouse, thanks to a very humane-sounding rule. The bad news for the cow, such as it is, took the form of a Harvey Weinstein joke, which was met with groans. "I'm still not sure if it's too soon yet," Kimmel said. Watch below. Peter Weber

5:24 a.m. ET

On Tuesday, President Trump dragged White House Chief of Staff John Kelly's son Robert Kelly, a Marine lieutenant killed in Afghanistan in 2010, into his evolving explanation for why it took him 12 days to acknowledge the deaths of four Green Berets in Niger or contact their families. On Tuesday night's AC360, Anderson Cooper began his analysis with Kelly's documented reluctance to politicize his son's death.

"In everything he said and did not say back then, and everything he's said and done since then, Gen. Kelly has refused to make the shared sacrifice of so many about his own personal loss," Cooper said. "Well, this morning, President Trump took Gen. Kelly's deeply private, searing, and eternal loss and made it about his own momentary personal gain." Trump had suggested that former President Barack Obama had not called Kelly with condolences, a point the White House aggressively pursued with the media.

"President Obama, like Presidents Bush, Clinton, George H.W. Bush, Reagan, and others before them honored the fallen in many ways — phone calls, letters, witnessing the caskets coming home, visiting the wounded," Cooper noted. "They did so frequently, often without bringing reporters along. None of them, Republicans and Democrats alike, wanted it to be about themselves, until now." Trump, "in his mind, simply cannon be wrong," he added, suggesting a motive for Trump stooping to this new level. "And that gives him license, it seems, for a lot," including bringing "his chief of staff's profoundest personal loss into the public realm." Watch below. Peter Weber

4:20 a.m. ET

Peter Navarro, one of President Trump's top White House trade advisers, has been circulating internally a two-page document that claims the loss of manufacturing jobs in the U.S. has led to "socioeconomic costs" like increases in abortion, divorce, spousal abuse, "drug/opioid use," mortality, and infertility, two administration officials tell The Washington Post, which obtained the documents. Navarro, like Trump, primarily blames trade deals like NAFTA for the decline in U.S. manufacturing jobs, rather than other factors, like automation.

Navarro has been sharing his charts throughout the White House, either at a staff or Cabinet level, without any evidence to back up his assertions, the Post says, adding: "His documents alarmed other White House officials, who worried that such unverified information could end up steering White House policy." You can view the charts and learn more in the video below. Peter Weber

3:22 a.m. ET

President Trump has zero major legislative accomplishments due in part to his crummy relationship with the Republican-led Congress, "but they don't want people knowing that," Trevor Noah said on Tuesday's Daily Show. So on Monday, Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) "came out to say that they're not just colleagues, they've been best BFFs forever." He played a clip of them showing love, and laughed. "It's funny watching these two try and sell us their romance," Noah said. "Who are they trying to convince? Because all you have to do is compare yesterday to every other thing that they've said." He showed some examples, then had second thoughts.

"I'm going to take that back — actually, that does sound like real love," Noah said, acting out an imaginary lovers' quarrel where Trump is throwing all McConnell's clothes out his Senate office window. But Trump did make people forget his strained relationship with McConnell by creating a new controversy about comforting the families of fallen troops. Noah was unimpressed with Trump's "dog ate my homework" excuse for not having mentioned the four U.S. soldiers killed in Niger 12 days ago, but less impressed that he dragged Barack Obama into it. "I don't know why Republicans insist on letting Donald Trump speak," he said, emoting pity for McConnell. "They should just stage relationship paparazzi pictures."

Noah shared more sympathy for McConnell during a break, showing off his "resting Mitch face" and using a bit of NSFW language. Peter Weber

2:07 a.m. ET

It took four late-night talk show hosts to tell the story of Conan O'Brien's gift horse. O'Brien kicked it off on Friday's Late Show, and Letterman told his version Tuesday on Jimmy Kimmel Live, on tour in Brooklyn. Letterman approached the horse story indirectly, describing his penchant for giving humorously inappropriate gifts — tires for a niece's wedding, his tie collection to Kimmel, cigarettes for his producer's son's bar mitzvah, and a horse to O'Brien, as thanks for a very nice article O'Brien wrote about Letterman before his retirement.

The idea, Letterman explained, was that he would send Conan a horse, Conan would send it back, and Letterman would get a refund. Instead, O'Brien kept it, and Letterman said he was irked at both the financial hit and the fact that Conan is now griping publicly about his gift. "You did send him the horse, in all fairness," Kimmel pointed out. "Yeah, it was a joke — take a dump on the stage, load him up, get him back — that's what it was," Letterman said. "The point is, no good deed goes unpunished." "And also, you know what?" Kimmel replied. "When in doubt, an edible arrangement is a nice gift." But Kimmel, who also likes a good practical joke, had his own gift for Letterman.

O'Brien took about nine minutes to tell Stephen Colbert his side of the story. Conan, it turned out, was expecting a nice bottle of wine, or — when he heard about the size of the package — a vintage Porsche. The story ended happier for the horse than for O'Brien. "I learned then that Dave is a genius, but he's an evil genius," Conan said. "He knew exactly what he was doing." Watch below. Peter Weber

2:02 a.m. ET
Munir Uz Zaman/AFP/Getty Images

In the process of forcing Rohingya Muslims to leave Myanmar, the country's military has killed hundreds of men, women, and children and burned down villages, a report out Wednesday by Amnesty International says.

Since 1982, Myanmar has denied citizenship to the Rohingya, and they are not one of the ethnic groups officially recognized by the government. On Aug. 25, an insurgent group called the Arakan Rohingya Salvation Army attacked dozens of security posts, and in retaliation, Myanmar security forces have been going from village to village, burning down buildings and shooting residents as they try to run away, witnesses told Amnesty International. In the chaos, more than 580,000 refugees have made their way to Bangladesh, with about 60 percent of the refugees children.

Amnesty International has interviewed more than 120 Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh, and they described villages being set ablaze, residents being shot at as they tried to escape, and the rape of women and young girls by Myanmar security forces. Many of those who died in the villages were sick, disabled, or elderly, and unable to flee from burning buildings, the witnesses said.

While it's not known how many people have died, satellite imagery shows the destruction of Rohingya buildings and mosques, with non-Rohingya dwellings just a few yards away intact, Amnesty International crisis researcher Matthew Wells told The Associated Press. "It speaks to how organized, how seemingly well-planned this scorched-earth campaign has been by the Myanmar military, and how determined the effort has been to drive the Rohingya population out of the country," he said. Catherine Garcia

12:40 a.m. ET
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

President Trump surprised White House officials Tuesday morning when he invoked one of Chief of Staff John Kelly's sons, Marine 1st Lt. Robert M. Kelly, who was killed in Afghanistan in 2010, The Washington Post reports. Trump was speaking on Fox News Radio, responding to criticism over his untrue comments Monday that former President Barack Obama never called the families of fallen troops, a comment he walked back when challenged, saying he was "told" Obama didn't call, and "all I can do is ask my generals."

"For the most part, to the best of my knowledge, I think I've called every family of somebody that's died, and it's the hardest call to make," Trump told Fox News Radio on Tuesday. "I mean, you could ask General Kelly, did he get a call from Obama? You could ask other people."

White House officials then anonymously told Fox News, NBC News, The Associated Press, and The Washington Post that Obama did not call Kelly, then a Marine general, upon the death of his son. Robert Kelly, 29, was married, and typically the president would call the widow, not the parents, of a fallen service member. Gen. Kelly, who has been very careful that his son's death not be politicized and reportedly recoils at any grieving family being used for political points, did attend a May 2011 breakfast Obama hosted for Gold Star families, and he sat at first lady Michelle Obama's table. Kelly, unusually and without explanation, did not attend a Trump news conference Tuesday afternoon.

About two dozen service members have died during Trump's presidency, and AP found at least a few whose widows or parents said they never got a call or letter from Trump, though they said the military and other White House officials were very warm. Trump called the families of the four solider killed in Niger on Tuesday, after 12 days of silence. Peter Weber

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