FOLLOW THE WEEK ON FACEBOOK
May 17, 2017
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

For now, it looks like President Trump will not be fulfilling his campaign promise to move the U.S. embassy in Israel to Jerusalem, Bloomberg reported Wednesday, citing a White House official. While this means Trump won't be making good on his word, Bloomberg noted that he will be "avoiding a provocation that could drive Palestinians away from peace talks."

In March 2016, Trump announced during a speech at the American Israeli Political Action Committee conference that he'd relocate the embassy to Jerusalem. While Trump declared the city the "eternal capital of the Jewish people," both Jews and Palestinians claim it to be theirs. Moving the Israeli embassy to Jerusalem would have effectively signaled that Jerusalem belongs to the Jewish people, likely throwing a wrench in Trump's other promise: to try to facilitate a peace deal between Israel and Palestine.

The Trump official told Bloomberg that peace talks with Israel and Palestine appear to be "promising" right now, which made the administration think it might not be "wise" to move the embassy "at this time." "We've been very clear what our position is and what we would like to see done, but we're not looking to provoke anyone when everyone's playing really nice," the official said.

Trump's plans to be the great maker of peace between Israel and Palestine hit another hiccup earlier this week when an American diplomat angered the Israeli prime minister by describing one of Judaism's holiest sites, the Western Wall, as being located in the West Bank, which is partially controlled by the Palestinian government. Trump is slated to visit the Western Wall in his first trip abroad next week. Becca Stanek

8:33 p.m. ET
AFP/Getty Images

Foxconn, the giant Taiwanese electronics manufacturer and a major supplier to Apple for iPhones, will open a 20-million square foot plant in southeast Wisconsin, the company announced Wednesday.

Over four years, the company will invest $10 billion to build the plant, which could employ up to 13,000 people and will make LCD display panel screens. Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) said the state will award $3 billion in incentives for the project, with the package needing approval from state legislature. He also said it will be the largest economic development in Wisconsin history, Reuters reports.

During a ceremony at the White House with Foxconn Chairman Terry Gou, President Trump took credit for the plant, saying, "If I didn't get elected, he definitely wouldn't be spending $10 billion…this is a great day for America." Catherine Garcia

7:55 p.m. ET
Federico Parra/AFP/Getty Images

In an attempt to pressure Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro into canceling this Sunday's election to choose members of an assembly that will rewrite the country's constitution, the United States on Wednesday imposed new sanctions on 13 current and former government officials, military officers, and managers at the state-run oil company.

They are being accused of undermining democracy, corruption, and alleged human rights abuses, The Guardian reports. The targeted officials include Nestor Reverol, who in 2016 was indicted in the U.S. on drug trafficking charges and the next day was promoted to interior ministry for security; army chief Jesus Suarez; and national police director Carlos Perez. Maduro said the Venezuelan government does not "recognize any sanctions," and the vote is still on.

Opposition leaders are boycotting the vote, which they believe will push Venezuela into an authoritarian regime; Maduro said instead, it will usher in peace following months of deadly anti-government protests. Catherine Garcia

7:09 p.m. ET
Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Kristin Beck knows what it's like to be in the military — over the course of her 20-year career as a Navy SEAL, she was deployed 13 times to places like Iraq, Afghanistan, and Bosnia, and received the Bronze Star for valor and Purple Heart for wounds suffered in combat.

Beck is a transgender veteran, and wants President Trump to know that his decision to ban transgender people from the U.S. military will have a negative impact on many, and there's no reason for this policy. "Being transgender doesn't affect anyone else," Beck, a member of SEAL Team 6, told Business Insider on Wednesday. "We are liberty's light. If you can't defend that for everyone that's an American citizen, that's not right."

In 2016, the RAND Corporation estimated there are between 1,320 and 6,630 transgender people serving in the military, and Beck, who was born Christopher Beck, said any unit with a good leader wouldn't have any issues with transgender troops. "I can have a Muslim serving right beside Jerry Falwell, and we're not going to have a problem," she said. "It's a leadership issue, not a transgender issue." What really bothers Beck is that Trump claimed his decision was partly based on the cost of services that could be used by transgender service members. "The money is negligible," she told Business Insider. "You're talking about .000001 percent of the military budget. They care more about the airplane or the tank than they care about people. They don't care about people. They don't care about human beings." Catherine Garcia

5:18 p.m. ET
Win McNamee/Getty Images

Sean Spicer tendered his resignation as White House press secretary last Friday, calling his time in the position "an honor and a privilege." While he'll stay in the White House through August, Spicer was spotted in New York City on Wednesday morning, where he was reportedly meeting with several TV networks, possibly in pursuit of a post-government gig.

But the most interesting option by far came from Page Six on Wednesday, when the site reported Spicer might be in talks to take his theatric personality to an actual stage: Reality dancing competition Dancing with the Stars has reached out to the former spokesman about appearing on the show, Page Six claims. "That has legs," an unnamed "TV insider" told Page Six of Spicer possibly cha-cha-ing on the hit ABC show.

When reached by Page Six on Wednesday about the rumor, Spicer said, "I have no comment." ABC told Page Six they "don't comment on casting."

But ... we can hope, right? Kimberly Alters

4:55 p.m. ET

On Wednesday, after Senate Republicans failed for the second time to repeal ObamaCare, even former Fox News staple Bill O'Reilly had to admit his pessimism. "Health care, not going to happen," O'Reilly tweeted. "The Republican Party cannot get it together."

O'Reilly was the leading host on Fox News until he was ousted amid sexual harassment allegations in April. Earlier this week, he defended President Trump's son-in-law and senior adviser Jared Kushner against allegations of Russia collusion by arguing Kushner is simply too baby-faced to be "fixing elections with Putin."

So, conservatives: When even Bill O'Reilly can't muster a defense for you, that might be a bad sign. Kimberly Alters

4:25 p.m. ET
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

On Wednesday, the Senate rejected a proposal to repeal ObamaCare without an immediate replacement, 45-55. Republican Sens. Lamar Alexander (Tenn.), Shelley Moore Capito (W.Va.), Susan Collins (Maine), Dean Heller (Nev.), John McCain (Ariz.), Lisa Murkowski (Alaska), and Rob Portman (Ohio) joined all Democrats in voting down the measure.

After rejecting Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell's plan to repeal and replace ObamaCare on Tuesday, senators will now move on to a "skinny repeal" plan, which would scrap ObamaCare's individual and employer mandates as well as the medical device tax, but leave everything else in place. The proposal has the best chance of allowing Senate Republicans to pass a bill — any bill — which would allow them to move on to conference with the House, where they could assemble a more comprehensive repeal plan.

The "skinny repeal" plan could face a vote by the end of the week. Kimberly Alters

4:07 p.m. ET
Alex Wong/Getty Images

While new White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci takes a "fire everyone" approach to dealing with leaks, embattled Attorney General Jeff Sessions is expected to shortly launch criminal investigations to catch the executive branch leakers that have so frustrated President Trump.

Multiple unnamed officials told The Washington Post in a report published Tuesday evening that "Sessions is due to announce in coming days a number of criminal leak investigations based on news accounts of sensitive intelligence information." Fox News reported the same thing Wednesday, apparently citing a different official, who said the announcement has "been in the works for some time and will most likely happen sometime in the next week."

This comes as Trump continues his public attacks on Sessions, seemingly pushing the attorney general to resign. Among his complaints, the president said Tuesday, is that Sessions should "be much tougher on leaks in the intelligence agencies that are leaking like they never have before. ... You can't let that happen." Bonnie Kristian

See More Speed Reads