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February 14, 2018

Apparently, a military parade through the nation's capital is not cheap.

White House budget director Mick Mulvaney predicted Wednesday that the cost of parading America's colors and munitions through Washington, D.C. — as President Trump apparently desires — could be as low as $10 million and as high as $30 million. The price tag hinges on the "scope" of the parade, Mulvaney told the House Budget Committee.

"Obviously an hour parade is different than a five-hour parade in terms of the cost and the equipment," he explained. The cost of the parade would not be folded separately into any budget proposal, Mulvaney said, but rather the White House would "have to find funds for it that [Congress] already appropriated."

The president's dream of a military parade was apparently spurred by a July 2017 visit to France, when French President Emmanuel Macron treated Trump to a display of tanks crawling down the streets of Paris and fighter jets soaring in the sky. Trump reportedly asked the Pentagon last year to create a plan for a parade that would be "grander than the one he saw in Paris."

Municipal officials in D.C. are not fans of Trump's parade idea, however. The city's mayor told The Washington Post last week that she was "concerned about the impact on the city, the impact on safety … and quite frankly, the attention it would attract." Kelly O'Meara Morales

11:35a.m.

At least 18 people were killed and about 160 injured when a passenger train derailed in Taiwan on Sunday evening local time. The train was carrying 366 people, and rescue efforts continue as several dozen were trapped on board. The line runs in a coastal area and is popular with tourists; an American woman was among those hurt.

Taiwanese President Tsai Ing-wen pledged "all our strength and efforts for the rescue" in a Facebook post offering condolences for the families of the victims and cautioning against speculation as to the cause of the crash while the investigation is underway. Bonnie Kristian

10:16a.m.

Afghanistan's parliamentary election was extended for a second day Sunday after Saturday's voting was marred by violence, technical difficulties and, in some places, polling stations that did not open at all.

This is the first such election since 2010, and it employs a biometric tracking system to avoid fraud that has not been widely tested. "More than 25 percent of the [voting] centers we observed were not opened," reported Naeem Ayubzada of Transparent Election Foundation of Afghanistan. "We also observed technical challenges with 32 percent of the biometric systems not working in 22 percent of the polling centres. Also, 9 percent of the centers were not equipped with the biometric system."

The Taliban, which remains powerful particularly in rural regions, has told Afghanistan's 8.8 million eligible voters to stay away from the polls, but despite these obstacles, more than 3 million voted Saturday. Bonnie Kristian

10:09a.m.

President Trump said Saturday he is reviewing a list of five candidates to replace outgoing U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley, and he expects to announce a decision soon. "We'll have somebody great," the president pledged. "We're going to pick somebody very quickly."

Two of the candidates are men, and three are women, Trump said, telling reporters he "might prefer" to have a woman in the role. "I think it's become maybe a more glamorous position than it was two years ago," he said. "Maybe, I wonder why, but it is. [Haley has] made it a very glamorous position."

Haley's next step remains unknown, as she has insisted she will not run for the presidency in 2020. Bonnie Kristian

10:02a.m.

President Trump said at a campaign rally in Nevada Saturday his administration is working on new tax cuts for the middle class and expects to reveal the plan before the midterms.

"We are going to be putting in and are studying very deeply right now, around the clock, a major tax cut for middle-income people," he said. "Not for business at all. For middle-income people." He described the timeline for the new cuts, as promised in May, as "sometime just prior, I would say, to November."

Congress is in recess until after the midterm elections and cannot pass any new tax law before November begins. Last December, Trump signed into law the largest tax reform bill since the 1980s. Bonnie Kristian

8:20a.m.

One day after telling reporters he found credible Saudi Arabia's "fist fight" explanation of journalist Jamal Khashoggi's death inside the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, President Trump expressed greater skepticism of the account.

"Nobody has told me [Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman is] responsible" for ordering Khashoggi's death, Trump told The Washington Post in a phone interview Saturday night. "Nobody has told me he's not responsible. We haven't reached that point ... I would love if he wasn't responsible."

The president dubbed the Saudi prince an "incredible ally," but conceded "obviously there's been deception, and there's been lies" about how Khashoggi died. The journalist went missing two weeks ago, and Riyadh previously denied all knowledge of his whereabouts. Saudi Arabia is known for its poor record on human rights, and the alliance has embroiled the United States in the gruesome Saudi intervention in Yemen.

Trump also reiterated his unwillingness to allow the killing to interfere with a lucrative arms deal with Saudi Arabia. "It's the largest order in history," he said. "To give that up would hurt us far more than it hurts them. Then all they'll do is go to Russia or go to China. All that's doing is hurting us."

See the Post's full report here. Bonnie Kristian

8:00a.m.

President Trump said Saturday evening he intends to withdraw the United States from the Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty, a Reagan-era arms control agreement with Russia (originally the Soviet Union) that eliminated thousands of short- and intermediate-range nuclear missiles.

"Russia has violated the agreement. They've been violating it for many years," Trump said. "And I don't know why President Obama didn't negotiate or pull out. And we're not going to let them violate a nuclear agreement and go out and do weapons and we're not allowed to."

NATO has confirmed Russian missile tests in the past decade likely violate the deal. "Russia has not provided any credible answers on this new missile," NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg said this month. "All allies agree that the most plausible assessment would be that Russia is in violation of the treaty. It is therefore urgent that Russia addresses these concerns in a substantial and transparent manner."

In early October, Ambassador Kay Bailey Hutchison, United States' permanent representative to NATO, said "countermeasures would be to take out the missiles that are in development by Russia in violation of the treaty" if Moscow does not change course.

The INF Treaty was originally signed in 1987 between then-President Ronald Reagan and Soviet General Secretary Mikhail Gorbachev. It took effect in 1988. Bonnie Kristian

October 20, 2018

A massive caravan of mostly Honduran migrants stalled Friday and Saturday at Mexico's southern border while trying to make their way to the United States.

Mexican authorities have said those who meet entry requirements, like holding a visa, will be allowed through, but so far only a trickle — many women and children — have made it past the bridge checkpoint over the Suchiate River where hundreds waited overnight.

Police in riot gear have used tear gas and smoke to control the crowd. Those permitted to apply for refugee status can stay in a shelter, but conditions on the bridge are rapidly becoming unsanitary.

President Trump has threatened to close the southern border to keep the migrants out, but he agreed Thursday night to evaluate their asylum claims. At a rally in Arizona Friday evening, Trump alleged "many of those people [in the caravan] — a fairly big percentage of those people — are criminals."

The group includes young children and pregnant women seeking to escape dire economic circumstances and even violence in their home countries. "We have suffered so much," one migrant mother on the bridge told CBS News. "She has a fever and we brought nothing," she added, gesturing to her baby. Bonnie Kristian

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