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May 20, 2018

Venezuela's electoral council declared President Nicolas Maduro the winner Sunday night of a presidential election boycotted by many opponents and marred by claims of irregularities. With 93 percent of precincts reporting, Maduro had 68 percent of the vote versus 21 percent for the main opposition candidate allowed to run, Henri Falcon. Turnout was just over 46 percent, despite extended polling hours, electoral authorities said; The Associated Press estimated that about 40 percent of voters participated, while the opposition put the figure at closer to 30 percent. The U.S. said earlier Sunday that it won't accept the results of the election.

Falcon, a former governor who defected from Maduro's Socialist Party in 2010, blamed the opposition boycott for his low numbers but also rejected the results, saying Maduro's victory "without any doubt lacks legitimacy and we categorically refuse to recognize this process." He specifically pointed to the 13,000 pro-government "red spots" set up near voting stations where poor Venezuelans were encouraged to scan their "fatherland cards" — which entitle them to government benefits — for a chance to to win a "prize." A third candidate, evangelical pastor Javier Bertucci, also slammed voting irregularities and, like Falcon and the opposition coalition, urged a new election.

Maduro declared victory, embarking on a second six-year term. Oil-rich Venezuela is five years into a brutal recession with annual inflation of 19,000 percent and rampant shortages of food and medicine. Maduro has stacked the Supreme Court and replaced the opposition-controlled National Assembly with a second legislature made up of supporters. That National Constituent Assembly had pushed up the presidential election, originally scheduled for December. The two most popular opposition candidates were barred from running and other potential candidates fled Venezuela. Peter Weber

2:01 a.m.

President Trump is officially kicking off his re-election campaign with a rally in Orlando on Tuesday, "and it makes sense he'd do it in the home of Disney, because his ideas are goofy and his base is snow white," Stephen Colbert said on Monday's Late Show. "Turns out, Trump's approval rating in Orlando is only 29 percent, and most of that is from SeaWorld, after he held that big meeting with the Prince of Whales."

So far, things are a little rough for Trump's campaign — he's trailing Joe Biden badly in a new Fox News poll and also leaked internal polls. "But Trump solved the problem of low poll numbers by firing his pollsters," Colbert said. "That's like firing a canary in a coal mine for its 'bad attitude.'"

Trump "talked about polling in an interview that aired last night with George Stephanopoulos," Colbert said, and he laughed at Stephanopoulos busting Trump for lying about reading the Mueller report, Trump calling Stephanopoulos "a little wise guy," and Trump tossing acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney from the Oval Office for coughing. "Can you imagine working for that guy?" he asked.

The Daily Show's Trevor Noah also marveled at Trump's all-access interview with Stephanopoulos, focusing on Trump's evident love of giving tours, how he "basically treats polls the way some people treat their bathroom scales," and Noah's "favorite moment from this interview," Trump's coughing fit.

"It's like a real-life episode of The Office," Noah laughed. "He's looking at the camera, the camera's going over. ... You have to give it to Trump — he might not be a good president, but he's a fantastic television professional." Also, he added, "I don't think it was a coincidence that his chief of staff just happened to cough right when Trump was talking about releasing his tax returns. Yeah, that didn't sound like a real cough, it sounded more like a 'Shut the f--k up about your taxes!'"

The Late Show had the same thought. Peter Weber

1:54 a.m.

If you use cocaine and call yourself an environmentalist, Colombian President Iván Duque considers you to be a hypocrite.

During an interview with The Guardian on Monday, Duque discussed the different ways cocaine production harms his country. "There are many people who present themselves as environmentalists, and if they want to be coherent, they must understand all the environmental damage that is caused by the production of cocaine — not just destroying tropical forests, [but] spreading chemicals in protected areas and destroying human capital," he said, adding, "How can you present yourself as a defender of the environment when you are creating so much harm? There needs to be an end to hypocrisy and inconsistency."

Colombia is the world's top producer of cocaine exports. Coca is the source of cocaine, and after years of spraying coca crops from the air with herbicides, Colombia stopped the practice in 2015; farmers had complained their legal crops were also being destroyed and the herbicide was linked to cancer. Duque told The Guardian he is bringing back aerial spraying, and it will start in a few weeks. The right-wing president added that his decision has nothing to do with the United States pressuring him to do something about an increase in cocaine exports to the country. Catherine Garcia

1:17 a.m.

With 50 seconds on the clock, Ryan Warren scrambled to grab as many non-perishable items as possible, knowing they would soon fill the shelves of the Calgary Food Bank.

Warren and his partner, Chantal Leroux, were "really excited" when they learned they won a shopping spree at Bragg Creek Foods, Leroux told CBC News. They were told they would have 50 seconds to grab what they wanted, up to $500. At first, Leroux pictured all of the items they could stock up on, but then it hit her: this was "a great opportunity to be able to give back."

On Saturday, Leroux and Warren arrived at the grocery store with a game plan: grab items that wouldn't spoil, so they could go to the food bank. During the allotted 50 seconds, Warren grabbed everything from canned vegetables to coffee to diapers, racking up a $598 bill (because they were helping the food bank, the extra $98 was covered). That wasn't all — before the shopping spree, Warren asked for donations from local businesses, and presented the food bank with a check for $1,500. This, Calgary Food Bank employee Avaleen Streeton said, was "absolutely phenomenal." Catherine Garcia

12:27 a.m.

Seth Meyers spent Monday's Late Night picking apart President Trump's headline-making interview with ABC News' George Stephanopoulos, but he kept coming back to one thing.

During the interview, Trump declared that he's totally fine with Congress somehow obtaining a copy of his financial statements, even though he won't be the one to provide them. As he was saying this, acting Chief of Staff Mick Mulvaney did something that grates on Trump's nerves: he started to cough. A visibly irritated Trump demanded that Mulvaney leave the room immediately, then shook his head at the idea that anyone would think to cough during such a moment. "Just remember, the next time Donald Trump says he has a great health care plan, the plan is if you cough, get the f--k out of here," Meyers said.

Because of Trump's rambling answer about the financial statements, Meyers said it's entirely possible that Mulvaney and Trump set up the cough as a signal to stop answering a question, but Trump forgot. "Also, I love he thought his answer was so good that the coughing ruined it," Meyers said. "Dude, you'd be better off if every answer you gave was interrupted by coughing." Watch the video below. Catherine Garcia

June 17, 2019

Former Daily Show host Jon Stewart lambasted Congress in Congress last week for slow-walking funding for 9/11 first responders, and "because the situation is urgent, yesterday Jon then met with the only constituents the Republican lawmakers listen to, Fox News," Stephen Colbert said on Monday's Late Show. Stewart singled out Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) as the main obstacle, and McConnell went on Monday's Fox & Friends to respond: Members of Congress "have a lot of things going on at the same time," he said, and "many things in Congress happen at the last minute," and Stewart appears to be "looking for some way to take offense" and shouldn't get "so bent out of shape."

Stewart popped up from underneath Colbert's desk with his own rebuttal. "Honestly, Mitch McConnell, you really want to go with the 'we'll get to it when we'll get to it' argument for the heroes of 9/11?" he asked. "Listen, senator, I know that your species isn't known for moving quickly," he added, explaining that the turtle joke was "just a little red meat for the base. But damn, senator, you're not good at this argument thing."

Stewart, it turns out, is pretty good at it, and he left McConnell with a suggestion — that he meet with 9/11 first responders tomorrow — and some food for thought: "If you're busy, I get it. Just understand the next time we have a war, or you're being robbed, or your house is on fire, and you make that desperate call for help, don't get bent out of shape if they show up at the last minute, with fewer people than you thought were going to pay attention, and don't actually put it out — just sort of leave it there, smoldering for another five years, because that's show s--t's done around here, mister. I'm sure they'll put it out for good when they feel like getting around to it." Watch below. Peter Weber

June 17, 2019

Just hours after announcing that the U.S. planned on cutting off aid to Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador, as President Trump ordered in March, the State Department on Monday night said it will move forward with $432 million in projects and grants already approved by Congress.

The Trump administration said it was stopping aid as a way to pressure the countries into doing more about the high number of undocumented migrants from Central America coming to the United States. The asylum seekers are fleeing poverty and violence, and several lawmakers argue that cutting off aid is cruel and counterproductive if you want to slow down migrants flows.

The continued funding, from the 2017 budget, supports health, poverty alleviation, and education programs that were too far advanced to end. The State Department said the Trump administration will work with Congress to determine what to do with an additional $200 million in approved funds it is diverting from the three countries, and some $370 million from the 2018 budget will be moved to other projects. Catherine Garcia

June 17, 2019

Rep. Katie Porter (D-Calif.) on Monday shared that after "weeks of study, deliberation, and conversations with Orange County families," she has "decided to support an impeachment investigation of the president."

Porter was the first Democrat ever elected in her Republican-leaning district, and she is now the first freshman House member from California to call for President Trump's impeachment. "I have not come to this easily," she said. "I come to this decision after much deliberation, and I know — deeply — what this means for our democracy."

Most of the more than 60 House Democrats who have voiced their support of impeachment come from liberal districts, and Republicans are already hoping to flip Porter's seat back to red next year, the Los Angeles Times reports. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) has said she wants to hold off on an impeachment inquiry, and would rather see voters oust Trump in 2020. Catherine Garcia

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