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2018 midterms
November 13, 2018

Democrat Josh Harder has defeated Republican Rep. Jeff Denham in California's 10th Congressional District, The Associated Press reports.

With the latest vote count released on Tuesday, Harder has a 4,919-vote lead over Denham, the four-term incumbent, and because there aren't many ballots left to count, there's no way he can overcome the deficit.

A first time candidate, Harder, 32, was born and raised in the 10th District, which sits in California's Central Valley. While campaigning, the venture capitalist said he will push for universal health care, and repeatedly brought up Denham's vote against the Affordable Care Act. Denham, 51, painted Harder as someone with an "extreme" agenda who doesn't understand the area.

This is the fourth Democratic pickup of a Republican House seat in California. In 2016, Hillary Clinton carried the district, but Denham was able to win his race by 3 percentage points. Catherine Garcia

November 13, 2018

After holding the lead for a week, Rep. Mimi Walters (R-Calif.) is now trailing her Democratic challenger in Southern California's 45th Congressional District by 261 votes.

Orange County released its latest ballot count on Tuesday evening. Walters was ahead of Democratic law professor Katie Porter by 3 percent on Election Day last Tuesday, but by Monday, her lead had dropped to 1,000. The Los Angeles Times says that typically in California, the last ballots counted are provisional or mailed late, and those usually favor Democrats.

In races that have been called, Democrats won three of 14 seats held by Republicans in California. Catherine Garcia

November 13, 2018

On Tuesday, Florida Democratic Sen. Bill Nelson's campaign filed a federal lawsuit to extend the statewide recount of last week's Senate race.

Nelson ran against Florida's current governor, Republican Rick Scott. Scott has a slight lead over Nelson, ahead by just .14 percent. By Florida law, when the top two candidates are within half a percentage point, counties must conduct a machine recount. That's been the case this month in the governor, U.S. Senate, and agriculture commissioner races.

The deadline for the recount is 3 p.m. ET Thursday, which the Palm Beach County elections supervisor has said will be "impossible to meet," USA Today reports. Nelson's campaign said the lawsuit "seeks to allow all local elections officials in the 67 Florida counties the time they say is needed to finish a legally mandated and accurate recount because the race was so close." Catherine Garcia

November 13, 2018

In her victory speech Monday night, the winner of the Arizona Senate race, Democrat Kyrsten Sinema, urged her supporters to show empathy and "embrace difference while seeking common ground."

Sinema defeated Republican Martha McSally, the win announced nearly a week after Election Day because it took that long to count enough ballots to determine the victor. Not all votes have been recorded, and Sinema said the U.S. is at "its best when everyone is engaged and everyone's voice is heard. That work isn't over, and we will continue to make sure every vote is counted."

A moderate, Sinema said that while campaigning, she met people who are "sick and tired of the dysfunction in Washington" and "want leaders who put aside party labels and focus on just getting things done." She said that's what she will do as senator, praising the late Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.) as "a legend" who didn't play political games. 


"His example shines a light on the way forward," Sinema said. "Sen. John McCain stood for everything we stand for as Arizonans: Fighting for what you believe in, standing up for what's right even if you stand alone, and serving a cause greater than one's self." McCain is "irreplaceable," but that doesn't mean he won't "guide our next steps forward. He taught us to always assume the best in others, to seek compromise instead of sowing division, and to always put country ahead of party. It's up to us to carry on Sen. McCain's legacy." Catherine Garcia

November 12, 2018

Democrat Kyrsten Sinema defeated Republican Martha McSally in the Arizona Senate race, The Associated Press, NBC News, and several other outlets project.

The winner wasn't apparent on Nov. 6, as Arizona still had a lot of votes to count, and on Monday, Sinema's lead over McSally grew to 1.7 percentage points. McSally tweeted her congratulations to Sinema, and said she remains "inspired by Arizonans' spirit" and believes "our state's best days are ahead of us."

Sinema, a three-term congresswoman who bills herself as a moderate, will fill the seat held by retiring Sen. Jeff Flake (R), becoming the first woman in state history elected to the Senate. Catherine Garcia

November 12, 2018

President Trump is once again baselessly claiming key Florida elections have been tainted by voter fraud, now also calling for election officials to stop counting votes and declare a Republican victory.

On Twitter Monday morning, Trump said that the gubernatorial and Senate races in Florida should be called for former Rep. Ron DeSantis (R) and Gov. Rick Scott (R), respectively. Republicans lead in both races, though each is tight enough to have prompted a recount. But Trump doesn't want to wait for recounts; he says the vote count from Election Day should stand, without counting any of the ballots tallied since.

This is despite the fact that in Florida, voters who are overseas at the time of the election, including members of the military, have until Nov. 16 to have their votes counted as long as their ballots were postmarked by the day of the election, reports Mediaite. But Trump isn't accepting that the vote tally has changed since last Tuesday, claiming that ballots have "showed up out of nowhere" and taking this as evidence of a "massively infected" process, even though the Florida Department of State says it has seen "no evidence of criminal activity at this time," reports Politico. Brendan Morrow

November 12, 2018

As Georgia's gubernatorial race continues to tighten as votes are counted, Democrat Stacey Abrams' campaign has filed a new lawsuit in federal court.

Abrams' campaign seeks to challenge the rejection of some absentee ballots, which were thrown out because of small mistakes, such as the voter listing the date they were filling out the ballot instead of their date of birth, The Washington Post reports. The suit also seeks to count provisional ballots that were rejected due to the voter still being listed as registered in a different county even after they've moved away.

This lawsuit concerns two counties, Gwinnett and Dekalb, and Abrams' campaign wants election officials to get in touch with the voters whose ballots have these problems rather than not counting the ballots at all. The Abrams campaign is also seeking to extend by one day the deadline by which counties must certify their election results, delaying it from Nov. 13 to Nov. 14, CNN reports.

Based on The New York Times' latest estimates, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp (R) currently leads Abrams with 50.3 percent of the vote. But that percentage has gradually lowered in recent days as additional votes have been counted, and if it drops below 50 percent, a run-off election will be held in December. Kemp has declared himself the winner and called on Abrams to concede the race. Abrams has refused to concede, and is no doubt hoping for a run-off. Brendan Morrow

November 9, 2018

Now that key Senate and gubernatorial races have tightened in Florida and Georgia, President Trump is pointing to fraud as the only possible explanation.

Trump on Friday accused attorney Marc Elias, who is representing Sen. Bill Nelson's (D-Fla.) campaign, of being an "Election stealing lawyer," claiming that Broward County "miraculously started finding Democrat votes" with Elias' help. The Senate race between Nelson and Republican Gov. Rick Scott has tightened so that Scott now leads by just 0.18 percent, enough to result in a hand recount, reports the Orlando Sentinel. Scott on Friday filed a lawsuit against two counties, alleging that "left-wing activists" have been "coming up with more and more ballots out of nowhere."

Trump is now echoing Scott, promising to send "much better lawyers to expose the FRAUD!" Florida's gubernatorial race is also likely headed to a recount, with Republican former Rep. Ron DeSantis and Democrat Andrew Gillum now separated by less than 0.5 percent.

The president also said that Georgians should "move on" and accept Republican Brian Kemp as the winner of Georgia's gubernatorial race. Kemp leads his Democratic opponent, Stacey Abrams, with just 50.3 percent of the vote, CNN reports. If he drops below 50 percent as more ballots are counted, there will be a run-off election.

In another tweet, Trump sarcastically quipped that we should "blame the Russians" for the fact that "they are just now finding votes in Florida and Georgia." Brendan Morrow

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